Recycling of Ideas

While some people might find it depressing to consider that there is no such thing as an original thought, I find it quite liberating to believe that everything we need to consider has already been created and our role is to recycle the ideas to serve our needs and the needs of the world as it exists today. In the book, Steal Like an Artist by Austin Kleon, he asserts that, “Every new idea is just a mashup or a remix of one or more previous ideas.” This approach allows us to let go of the stress of creating something new and, instead, look to those who have created before us and allow ourselves the freedom to study and learn as much as possible with the intent to bring all those ideas together in a different way that surprises and satisfies us. Take the time to learn from those you admire, to explore what others have done and attempt to copy their work, not in direct imitation but in the spirit of the work. When we make the attempt to reproduce others – because we are humans, not machines – we will naturally create our very own unique piece of work. It will reflect our history, our views, and our collective learnings. In the spirit of recycling ideas, it is important to fill our head with as many ideas from as many sources as possible to be able to draw upon them as needed. By recycling ideas we are creating new versions that others can then use as input into their learnings and their outcomes. YOUR CHALLENGE: Choose three of your favorite authors, write down some learning from each one of them, and then look for ways to change your business to reflect these ideas within your business.   If you would like further information or you have any questions about this blog, you can email me at pjweiland@actioncoach.com or call 847-739-3079. Please visit www.workingonthebusiness.com to register for my complimentary workshop, 6 Steps to a Great Business, and let’s work together to help your business grow.

Changing of the Guard

As a business owner, ask yourself: “In what ways would my company be better if I focused on a succession plan?” What a great question to really consider when you are looking to grow and improve your business. Succession planning for most businesses takes a backseat to every day operations, to chasing the next sale, or solving the current crisis. This happens more than you would expect. So much so that only one out of four business owners makes a successful transition to the second generation, and only one out of three to the third generation. It isn’t the change that will do you in, it is the transition itself that will be the biggest hurdle. As referenced in Changing Places by Franzetta and Jackson:

“Change is situational – the move to a new site, the retirement of a founder, the reorganization of a team. Transition on the other hand is psychological; it is a three-phase process that people go through as they internalize and come to terms with the details of the new situation that change brings about.”

Planning for transition takes time and takes careful planning. You will need to consider what you are trying to accomplish, the people in the organization, and the complexity of the business issues at hand. All of these need to be accounted for when determining changes in leadership, changes in responsibility, or changes in the structure of the business. There is a sense of urgency that needs to be accommodated in the planning, while executing on a transition plan can be done over a longer period of time – often years. YOUR CHALLENGE: Take the time to review your long-term plans for the business. Write them down, share them with key people, and make a commitment to yourself and your business to do one thing this month that will move you closer to those goals.   If you would like further information or you have any questions about this blog, you can email me at pjweiland@actioncoach.com or call 847-739-3079. Please visit www.workingonthebusiness.com to register for my complimentary workshop, 6 Steps to a Great Business, and let’s work together to help your business grow.